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One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand

One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand

 

1. How does Spenser in his Sonnet No 75 (One day I wrote her name upon the strand) propose to immortalize his love and his beloved? Is he realistic? 

Ans. Sonnet No. 75 (“One day I wrote her name upon the strand’) is a poem in which Spenser as a lover proposes to immortalize his beloved Elizabeth Boyle and their love in such a way that posterity will ever like them to remain fresh and charming. In fact he is called upon to do so when a challenge to the contrary is thrown at him by her

While standing by the side of a sea the lover is seized with the desire of writing his sweetheart’s name indelibly on the strand (=sandy shore) to show his deep love for her. As he writes her name there the tidal waves come and efface it in no time. He writes it for the second time with the same result. Seeing it the beloved in a tone of banter calls him vain (=proud) and remarks tha: in vain does he attempt to make imr ortal one who is mortal by nature. She adds that after her physical dissolution her name will be wiped out like his writing on the strand.

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The lover who is keenly conscious of his poetic ability is piqued (=hurt) at this and says in a bold and serious tone that such a fate will not await her, for he will make her famous in his poetry and she will live not by years but by fame. Her love being pure, it will live and not die like baser things in dust. His verse will ‘eternize’ the rare virtues that she possesses–qualities like beauty, love, loyalty, modesty and chastity. In addition he will write her name in the high heavens (i.e. his poetic firmament) far away from the gross atmosphere of the earth where Death like a masterly destructive force subdues (=humbles) all. But her name will remain safe as it will be beyond its reach. From there it will remind others of their pure and noble love and continue to inspire and invigorate young lovers of every age in such day’s when their love dwindles and becomes moribund.

Let us now try to understand what the beloved and the lover exactly say in this without which the second part of the question cannot be answered properly. Now the beloved stresses that she is a mortal thing and that through death her condition will ultimately

be similar (ʻlyke’) to ‘this decay’ (i.e. wiping out of her name by the waves or her final extinction from the world). The lover reassures her that she will by fame, that his verse will ‘eternize’ her rare virtues, that he will write her glorious name in the heavens and that their love will ‘live without being subdued by death.

As the lover nowhere says that he will make her live physically for ever, his statement is not unrealistic and it is quite credible and acceptable. His further assertion that his verse will make her famous and she will live by fame is, again, not off from reality. When he again affirms that his verse will immortalize her rare qualities, he is not putting forward something improbable but is merely sticking to some oft-repeated poetic convention (i.e. immortalization through verse) that has an ancient origin. His claim that he will write her glorious name in the heavens (=sky) may appear somewhat tall but it cannot be denied that it is the universal aspiration of every lover. Moreover if the word “heavens’ is taken in its metaphorical sense (i.e. poetic sky) there is nothing unusual in it. Finally, if the appeal of verse (which is really admirable) is not merely for an age but also for the succeeding ones (in view of the fact that art is longer than life) his claim that their ‘love shall live and inspire ‘later life’ (i.e. other lovers who will come after them) is neither hyperbolic nor unbelievable (moreover it naturally follows when his verse will immortalize her rare virtues). We are, therefore, of the view that the tagged question is inapt (=unsuitable), inapposite (=in =, inapposite (=in appropriate) and inharmonious with literary judgement..

 2. What makes Spenser believe that love shall live and later life renew’? Is it too facile a view? 

Ans. In his Sonnet No. 75 (“One day I wrote her name upon the strand’) the poet-lover tries to dispel his beloved’s fear that her name, after her death, will be wiped away from the earth like her on thë stráñd=sandy shore) that is removed by the incoming waves. He asserts that so long he will be able to exercise his poetic powers he will not allow her name to disappear that normally takes place in the case of ordinary human beings. To him she is an exceptional woman possessing rare virtues like love, beauty, modesty, loyalty and chastity. So she will not die in dust name

like ‘baser things’ but will live like a pure object ever in his verse. She will be made famous in his poetry; so she will live not by years but by fame—the fame that his poetry will bring for her. She will be preserved in his poetry which will eternalize her rare qualities. It is in this way that the lover tries to comfort her.

But his attempt does not end there. He further states something that is bound to sound pleasant in every beloved’s ear. He plans to keep her name at a place where it will not be forgotten by other’s nor can Death, which defeats all earthly objects, do any harm to it. Then like young romantic lover he announces he will write her ‘glorious (=celebrated; distinguished) name in the ‘heavens’ (metaphorically meaning his poetic sky) wherefrom it will blaze to remind mortal people below of their pure and wonderful love and shine brilliantly like a star to ‘renew’ (i.e. to fill with new energy and vigour; to inspire; to revitalize) ‘later life’ (i.e. young lovers who will come after them) particularly in such days when their own love sags (=sinks) and goes to be moribund (=at the point of death).

It is difficult for us to agree with the opinion that by asserting that their ‘love shall live, and later life renew’ Spenser has expressed a view that is too facile (=superficial) in nature. Undoubtedly the critic believes that it is not possible for poetry to preserve love after one’s death nor is it possible for such love to inspire (*renew’) later lovers and to have faith in them cannot but be a sign of superficility. We would like to remind the holder of such a view that belief in verse’s ability to confer immortality to one (which in its turn can inspire later people age after age) is not Spenser’s own capricious invention but which had its origin in the long past in European literature. Besides if poetry does not have the power to immortalize love (i.e. ‘love shall live’) how has it been possible for Omar Khayyam to preserve his beloved and their love in Rubbaiyat, a wonderful book of verse that readers in every age read with avid (=eager), interest? Hence to hold a view that perpetualization of love by any means other than the erection of a grand building like the Taj cannot but be shallow and superficial is something we cannot agree with, and justifiably demand it to be spurned (=rejected with contempt) at any cost. We rather believe that by seeking to immortalize their love through verse the poet

has really done

(=admirable; commendable) job.

and creditable credible (=believable)

3. Show how Spenser gives a dramatic structure to the language of emotion in the sonnet (No. 75 of The Amoretti). 

Ans. Though it cannot be denied that lyric becomes more intellectual than emotional in the hands of such modern poets as T. S. Eliot and W. H. Auden, yet the majority of poets, both ancient and modern, makes use of emotive language whenever the question of lyric arises. Sonnet being a form of lyric, no language other than an emotional one will be found suitable for it. It can be experimentally shown that in a sonnet if a dull and prosaic language is used in place of a sonorous and emotional one, its appeal cannot be as wide-spread as it would have been had it been expressed otherwise. Spenser’s Sonnet No. 75 (“One day I wrote her name upon the strand’) succeeds primarily because of its emotional expression.

But Spenser’s success does not merely end with the widespread emotional appeal of the sonnet. His poetic skill is further shown through his ability to raise a dramatic structure with the help of this emotional language. This is mainly created with such unavoidable dramatic elements as setting, characters, action, dialogue and clash of interests. Let us discuss the same to point out how Spenser gives a dramatic structure to the language of emotion in this sonnet. а

The poem presents a dramatic setting. On the one hand there is the vast tyde-torn sea and on the other absolute lonelines pierced by the presence of two human beings who love each other. There are high waves lending a sportive charm to the background. The lover’s talk to each other, possibly about love, possibly about the shaping of their future, is no less charming than the former.

The characters are equally interesting. One is a poet of no ordinary merit but one having uncommon faith in his poetic powers by the help of which he seeks to immortalize his beloved in his verse. He has no doubt whatsoever that his poetry will earn fame which will supply nourishment to her (even after her physical dissolution). The other person, the beloved, is no less attractive.

a

She is a woman of virtue for which she will not die in dust like other human beings. She can also use her tongue aptly and rouse her lover by her banter (=good-humoured teasing) to such a state so as to make him deny the possibility of a future which she Jaments. Thus, as dramatis persona both the lover and his ladylove appear highly interesting to us.

Although the poem is a sonnet consisting of not more than fourteen lines yet Spenser has introduced dialogue to lend it a dramatic charm. It will not be an exaggeration if we affirm that the whole story of the poem is developed through dialogue that takes place between the lover and his beloved. While the dialogue of the beloved reflects banter, challenge and fear of extinction, that of the lover reveals high seriousness, denial of the charge, confidence in poetic powers and complete removal of fears and compliants. Thus the tone of the dialogue as used in the poem is a wide-ranging one.

The action as found in the poem is also highly dramatic in nation. As they stand together the lover is suddenly seized with a desire of writing the beloved’s name indelibly on the sandy shore in order to show his deep love to her. But his attempt is frustrated by the waves which brush away her name. He writes it for the second time but the writing faces the same fate. Seeing this the beloved is prompted to call him a vain (=proud) man who is trying in vain (=uselessly) to immortalize a thing which is mortal (=subject to death) by nature. She further says that she herself will be alike to this decay’ (i.e. the destruction of her name by the waves) and that her name also will be wiped out of the earth. To assuage (=to lesson) her fear he says that this will not happen so long he will be able to exercise his poetic powers. He announces that she will not die in dust like a base material but will live by fame’ for his verse will ‘eternize’ (=eternalize) all the rare virtues that she possesses. Then to put her mind at rest about the effacement of her name he assures her that he will keep it at a place where Death, which subdues ‘all the world’, will be unable to reach it or do it any form. He promises that he will write her name across the sky (by which he metaphorically means his poetic sky) in letters of fire so that it will be able to remind others of the permanence of their love as well as to revitalize (*renew’) later lovers at a time when their love sags and is at the point of death. Thus the action mainly moves through speech in which challenge

(at the ability of his poetic powers to immortalize her name and love) is thrown and answered and fear is replaced by reassurance.

Finally, we shall deal with the clash of interests which is the key point of a dramatic structure. The poet has presented it finely in this poem. Thus we notice that the vastness of the sea is contrasted with the smallness of human endeavour and – the beloved’s pessimism with the bold optimism of the lover. Again, her banter and challenge meet finely with the serious tone and confidence of the lover. The shortness of life is placed well beside the longevity of art (i.e. poetry). Again the subduing of earthly things by Death is boldly challenged by the death-defying power of love.

4. What features of Spenserian poetry are illustrated in Sonnet No. 75 (“One day I wrote her name upon the strand) taken from The Amoretti ? 

Ans. The Amoretti is undoubtedly one of Spenser’s most remarkable works. His Sonnet No. 75 (“One day I wrote her name upon the strand) which is taken from it is found to be highly satisfying to both critics and ordinary readers. Though short the poem is able to reflect certain features of Spenserian poetry which are discussed below:

The first feature of Spenserian poetry which Sonnet No. 75 illustrates is the poet’s habit of borrowing from the literary tradition of Europe, particularly from Italy. This is particularly noticeable in the form which he chooses for this poem. It is a sonnet which had its origin in Italy. In respect of its size, metre and thematic unity it follows the Italian model. That is why it consists of fourteen lines, employes iambic metre and has immortalization through verse as its central theme. Although from the standpoint of stanzaic pattern it is nearer to the English type of sonnet (consisting of three quatrains and a couplet), it cannot be denied that from the standpoint of thematic structure it has similarity with an Italian sonnet which is divisible into an octave (in which a problem such as the extinction of the bel’aved’s name in the hands of the tyde and Death in the present poem is raised) and a sestet (in which the problem is resolved such as the immortalization of her name in his verse as shown in the same poem). Again, the heroine

in this sonnet is drawn after the Petrarchan model to some extent. This is seen in her accusing the lover as a vain man and in flatly stating that he will not be able to save her name from extinction.

The second feature of Spenserian poetry as demonstrated through Sonnet No. 75 is the wide scholarship of the poet. There is a subtle reference to the scholastic theory of the nature of substances. According to Saint Thomas Aquinas, the propounder of this theory, a thing dies off the earth when it is made of base (=mean) materials in which contrareity exists whereas a pure thing. in which there is no such contrareity (=contrariness; antagonism) continues to live ignoring the wrath (=fierce anger) of Death. There is an allusion to this theory when the lover reminds his beloved that unlike ‘baser things’, that will die in dust, she for her purity will ‘live’-live not by years but by fame’ which his poetry will bring for her.

Thirdly, another feature of Spenserian poetry which is found in this poem is a well-known literary convention that came into being since the Renaissance. It is the poet’s power of making his beloved (or someone other than she) live permanently in his verse. When the beloved expresses her conviction (=firm belief) that like the writing of her name on the strand her name will one day be wiped out of this world along with her physical extinction, he reassures her by stating that he will write her name in the heavens’ (i.e. his poetic firmament) where the all-subduing Death will be unable to do her any harm and wherefrom like a blazing star her name will remind people below of their pure and wonderful love and renew (=inspire; revitalize) young lovers who will come after them (ʻlater life’).

Fourthly, another feature of Spenserian poetry which this poem upholds is the poet’s concern (=worry) for moral uprightness. Unlike Petrarch, Spenser does not deal here with any adulterous love (i.e. love of an unmarried man for a married lady) but shows his prime concern (=interest) for moral virtue. That is why the lover resolves to ‘eternize’ the rare virtues (such as love, beauty, modesty, loyalty and chastity) that the beloved possesses, Love as depicted here is, again, between two persons who are unmarried and who do not suffer from any moral blemish. (The assurance that she will not die in dust like baser things also points to the purity of her character).

Fifthly, another Spenserian poetic trait which this poem possesses is the inclusion of something whereby it becomes highly interesting and attention drawing. To our mind this is supplied in the present case through the introduction of some dramatic elements. Let us first think of the background. On the one hand there is the vast sea and on the other an enormous loneliness punctured by two human lovers. The dramatis personae consists of two persons: the beloved mildly pokes fun at his attempt to immortalize a mortal thing and the lover solemnly (=seriously) asserting that he will not let win victory over their love. The story develops through dialogue between them that ranges all the way from banter, challenge, doubt and fear to denial, assertion, confidence and reassurance. The action progresses mainly through speech. The beloved accuses the lover of pride, expresses doubt at his ability by challenging him that he will not be able to keep alive her name and complaints that her name like the writing on the sand will be wiped out of the earth along with her physical dissolution. The lover boldly denies this, asserts that she will not die in dust but live by fame for his verse will ‘eternize’ her rare qualities and reassures her that he will write her ‘glorious name’ in the heavens beyond the reach of Death wherefrom it will remind earthly people of their pure and wonderful love and continue to rejuvenate later lovers in all succeeding ages. The poem is not without some elements of conflict which is considered to be the soul of drama. Thus the vastness of the sea is set against the littleness of human endeavour, the beloved’s pessimism against the optimism of the lover, the shortness of life (such as the beloved’s) against the longevity of art (such as poetry). The most notable clash is between Death that all the world subdues and love that triumphs over this destructive force of Nature. Sixthly, another feature of Spenserian poetry which this poem reflects is the music of verse for which Spenser is especially notable.

Here it is created with the help of rhyme (strand, hand), alliteration (our love shall live, and later life renew), soft consonants (My verse your vertues rare shall eternize) semivowels (But came the waves and washed it away), liquid consonants (let baser things devize), and long vowels (“Vayne man,” said she, “that doest in vaine assay”).

Seventhly, another feature of Spenserian poetry which this poem displays is the poet’s use of obsolete and archaic words as well as coinage of new words out of existing ones. In Sonnet No. 75, Spenser uses such obsolete words as “eek’ (=more) and quod’ (=said; replied) and archaic words such as ‘assay’ (=attempt) and ‘whenas’ (=whereas). These together with old spellings of certain words (such as ‘paynes’ for pains and pray’ for prey) add an old-fashioned attractiveness to this poem. Among his coinages for which Spenser is famous we can cite one example from this poem which is ‘eternize’ used in the sense of eternalize or immortalize.

Finally, this poem displays another feature of Spenserian poetry which is the superb artistry (=artistic skill) of the poet. This is first seen in his imagery in which he thinks of a bird of prey in his expression ‘and made my paynes his pray’ and of a relentless conquerer in ‘death shall all the world subdew, and later in the use of an interlinked or interwoven rhyme-scheme in which Spenser may be looked upon as an innovator. The rhyme scheme as employed in Sonnet No. 75 is abab bcbccdcd ee. It is so complicated in design (e.g. the use of b and c for as many as four times) that none but a dexterous rhymer can alone succeed in it. In his use of three quatrains and a couplet Spenser may be said to have anticipated Shakespeare. We may further observe that by including a rhyming couplet at the end of his sonnet Spenser has shown that farsightedness which can foresee its use as a telling (=effective; impressive) conclusion to the poem.

5. Show how the theme of triumph of virtuous life and renewing love over time and death has been worked out in Spenser’s Sonnet No. 75 (‘One day I wrote her name upon the strand’).

Ans. Spenser’s Sonnet No. 75 (“One day I wrote her name upon the strand’) taken from The Amoretti’ is a wonderful poem that deals with both life and love. By way of argument he shows that life when mixed with virtue cannot die in dust as ordinary life does and that love. when it is free from grossness can outlive the onslaughts (=attacks) of time and death.

As the lover and his beloved stand together by the side of the sea the former is suddenly seized with the desire of writing the beloved’s name on the strand (=sandy beach or shore). Mindless of what harm the waves can do to his writing, he spells her name on the sand to show his deep love to her. His intention was to write her name so indelibly that none could efface it at any time. But soon the tide comes and removes her name. Unperturbed, he writes it for the second time but the cruel tide comes once again and obliterates her name, bringing thereby a sad end to his labour. Seeing this the ladylove who cannot suppress her laughter remarks with some mild banter (=good-humoured teasing) that he is proudly trying in vain to immortalize a thing which is mortal by nature. Probing deeper she sadly observes that (i) she will be similar to the decay’ (i.e. destruction of the letters spelt on the strand) that has taken place before their very eyes and that (ii) her name will be wiped out from the earth after her physical dissolution.

This gives the lover a chance to express his opinion about what she has already said. He emphatically denies that she will be ‘lyke (=alike; similar) to this decay (i.e. spelt words that become an easy prey to the hounding (=pursuing waves). As she is a woman of virtue there is no question of her sudden and complete extinction like the words on the sand. Nor will she meet an ignoble end for it is only “baser things’ that die “in dust’. As she is not made of such gross stuff it follows hat she will have an honourable death—one that will make people remember her for a long time to come. What is more, the lover says that he will not allow her ‘vertues rare,’ such as love, beauty, modesty, loyalty and chastity, to escape in the air without leaving any mark behind. On the other hand, his verse, he promises solemnly and announces boldly, will ‘eternize’ (=immortalize) her rare virtues as a result of which she will live by fame which his poetry will earn for her. As fame will continue to provide her sustenance (=food) for an unlimited period, and as her virtues will be immortalized in his verse the whole thing can be regarded as the triumph of a virtuous life over time.

The poet has yet to remove the beloved’s fear that her name will be ‘wypéd out’ like the letters spelt by her lover on the strand soon after the dissolution of her body. Again he denies firmly what she fears and boldly declares that he will write her name in

letters of fire (by which he means her ‘glorious name’) across the sky (by which he means the poetic firmament of his own creation) where it will blaze on defying death that subdues (=defeats, controls) “all the world’. As her name will shine high above in a pure and the real atmosphere it will be beyond the reach of death for which it will be unable to do any harm to her name. Besides it will be a constant reminder to the mortal people lying below of their unparalled and wonderful love which will not die but live’ for ever as it is a pure stuff having no sensual grossness in it. Such love will also add vigour and freshness to young lovers who will come after them particularly in the days of their sagging love. As their love will live even after their physical disappearance and as it will rejuvenate young lovers from age to age this can without hesitation be looked upon as the triumph of their renew love over death that humbles all earthly things.

6. What anti-Petrarchan elements do you notice in Spenser’s Sonnet No. 75 (‘One day I wrote her name upon the strand’) taken from The Amoretti?

Ans. Edmund Spenser, a product of the English Renaissance, was greatly indebted to Francesco Petrarch, one of the founding fathers of the Italian Renaissance. While studying in Cambridge Spenser translated some of Petrarch’s sonnets into English and also got from him the idea of writing his sonnets in a sequence. Anyone who has read Spenser’s sonnets will testify that Petrarch’s influence in some of them (such as love’s warfare in Sonnet No. 11, its ambush in Sonnet No. 12, its siege in Sonnet No. 14 and its fight with archers in Sonnet No. 16) is clear and undeniable.

The majority of Petrarch’s sonnets were inspired by his passion for Laura about ‘whom very little is known except that when he saw her first in a church she was already married. The poet himself admitted that was Laura who made him a poet. The central theme of his sonnets is ‘hopeless love, a spiritualized passion for the unattainable’. It is interesting that in these sonnets the poet remains permanently in the centre of the stage ‘exploring indefatigably all the delicate phenomena of his emotions’. His sentiments that are found in them spring from the discord between the senses and the soul, the flesh and the spirit, the

sensuality of his love and a mystic acceptance of its spirituality’. To present this conflict he has frequently made use of antithesis, paradox, oxymoron and the conceit . ‘He does not fight or rebel against the conflict but records it with tender melancholy in plaintive tones………with the elegance of technical perfection’. He has also developed the musical quality in his sonnets ‘with the greatest sensitivity’. Because of his deftly handling Petrarch and Laura have become to European minds in particular ‘symbols of passionate love constrained by spirituality’.

It is possible find some similarity between Petrarch and Spenser. As the former’s sonnets were inspired by his deep-seated but unattainable love for Laura, those of the latter were similarly inspired by his passionate love for Elizabeth Boyle. While Petrarch’s love was sensuous and at the same time a spiritualized passion, in Spenser’s sensuous love for Elizabeth could also be found some reflections of the divine spirit. Like Petrarch, Spenser too aimed to develop the musical qualities in his poems with utmost care and sensitivity. In their sonnets both the poets, again, succeeded in showing their technical mastery in a superb way.

There are certain points, however, in respect of which both the poets are different in nature. While Petrarch’s theme is basically sadness and disappointment in love, thal. of Spenser is joy and happiness in love. Again, Petrarch sings for adulterous and married love but Spenser rejoices in unmarried and legal love. Very little is known about Petrarch’s mistress Laura but much is known about Elizabeth Boyle, the Irish woman whorn Spenser wooed and married. While Laura remains’ cruel, haughty and unattainable, Elizabeth to Spenser became attainable for marriage for which he is found to be a singer of successful love. Again, while Petrarch always occupies the centre stage of attention in his series of sonnets, Spenser frequently leaves it for Elizabeth in order that she can stand in the focus of attention. The conflict between the flesh and the spirit is almost a regular feature in Petrarch whereas it is almost absent in Spenser for which antithesis, paradox and oxymoron which are so abundant in the former are but sparingly used by the latter. Unlike Petrarch, Spenser does not like to spend his energy to paint his sentiments as delicately as possible, nor does he desire to depict in detail the inner struggle which is an essential feature of Petrarch’s poetry. Further, while there is a touch of the

ascetic in Petrarch’s love, it remains conspicuously absent in Spenser’s love which sometimes does not even hesitate to be voluptuous in spirit. Again, while the lover’s mood is often mournful and gloomy in Petrarch, it is often joyful and romantic

in Spenser Spenser’s Sonnet No. 75 (“One day I wrote her name upon the strand’) taken from The Amoretti clearly possesses some antiPetrarchan features. Firstly, its theme is not about hopeless love but about one that can be crowned with success. Again, unlike Laura, Spenser’s ladylove is not a married woman. Hence Spenser is not a singer of illicit love as Petrarch is. Laura is often distant, cold and cruel, but Elizabeth’s cruelty goes as far as sportive teasing. Spenser confidently declares that his verse will ‘eternize’ the rare virtues of his mistress, but such a confident note is lacking in Petrarch. The Italian poet shows his mastery in the use of imagery, a point in which Spenser’s attainment is not so high. The excellence with which Petrarch uses figures like antithesis, oxymoron and conceit is sadly missing in Spenser. Petrarch is more interested in sketching the different moods and sentiments of the lover whereas Spenser remains busy in clearing the doubts that arise in the beloved’s mind. The inner struggle between the flesh and the spirit is a prominent feature in Petrarch. Spenser, on the other hand, avoids this and lays more emphasis on the triumph of a virtuous life and re-newing love on time and death. Finally, Petrarch’s ascetic touch and melancholy tone in love is wholly absent in Spenser’s voluptuous and passionate love which is considered a happy means to a happy end requiring neither withdrawal from society nor sadness that results from unrequited love.

Their sonnets are also different from the standpoint of form. While Petrarch’s octave consists of two similar quatrains (abab abab), that of Spenser is made of two interwoven quatrains (abab bcbc). Petrarch’s sestet is mostly, made of two tercets (cdecde) but in case of Spenser it is made of one quatrain fcdcd) and a couplet (ee), While a rhyming final couplet is unthinkable in Petrarch, its presence in Spenser’s sonnet often helps him to reach a neat epigrammatic conclusion. While Petrarch’s sonnets are notable for their delicate and refined expression, Spenser often compensates this by using obsolete and archaic words (such as ‘cek” “quod” etc. in the present sonnet) which add a poems.

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One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand

One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand

One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand

One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand One day I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand

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