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Keats Ode to Autumn Questions and Answers Pdf Marks-2

Keats Ode to Autumn Questions and Answers Pdf

 

Q. 1. Write a note on the structure of the poem, To Autumn.

Ans. There are eleven iambic lines with a slight variation of rhyme scheme in the three stanzas in Keats’ To Autumn. The equal number of lines in each three stanzas are found here.

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Q2. What do the three stanzas suggest in To Autumn?

Ans. The three stanzas suggest autumn’s rhythms of work, indulgence, and atonement.

Q 3. What is the predominating figure of speech in To Autumn?

Ans. To Autumn as a poem is notable for its sustained use of personification. Keats makes a subtle use of allegory throughout this poem, most explicitly in the second stanza, which personifies the season as a female figure amid the scenes and activities of the harvest.

Q 4. What is the theme of To Autumn?

Ans. In To Autumn the speaker presentsan appreciative catalogue of autumn’s attributes.

Q 5. Locate and annotate: “Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness (1.1).”

What figure of speech do you find in ‘mellow fruitfulness’? Ans. This is the opening line of Keats’ poem To Autumn. The figure of speech we find in ‘mellow fruitfulness’ is synecdoche.

Q. 6. Why is Autumn called the season of mists?

Ans. Autumn is described as the season of mists because during this season the air is filled with mists and the atmosphere is mostly hazy.

Q. 7. Why is Autumn called the season of ‘mellow fruitfulness?

Ans. Autumn is called the season of ‘mellow fruitfulness’ because ripening fruits grow in this season in abundance. Autumn is described as the season of mellow fruitfulness because the autumnal sun causes all fruits to ripen to the core and loads the vines with fruits.

Q. 8. Who are bosom friends?

Ans. The sun and autumn are close bosom friends because they collaboratively help fruits grow and ripen to the core.

Q. 9. What figure of speech is seen in”mellow fruitfulness”?

Ans. Autumn is described as the season of mellow fruitfulness because the autumnal sun causes all fruits to ripen to the core and loads the vines with fruits. The phrase “mellow fruitfulness” contains metonymy of the variation abstract for the concrete. Fruitfulness is an abstract in place of fruits as concrete.

Q.10. How does Keats address Autumn? Who is Autumn’s friend?

Ans. Keats addresses Autumn as a “season of mists and mellow fruitfulness”. He also describes Autumn as the close-bosom friend of the maturing sun.

Q.11. What do the two friends do in the poem?

 

Ans. The two friends Autumn and the Sun are planning to load the vines with fruits, and ripen all fruits to the core. They also plan to make the cottage over laden with fruits in full maturation.

Q.12. “Conspiring with him how to load and bless (1.3).” – Who conspire with whom? Why do they conspire’?

Ans. The line simply means that Autumn co-operates with her friend, the Sun to make the vines heavy with a load fruits. They plan together to make the cottage trees over laden with apples, to swell the gourd and to fill the hazel nuts with sweet kernel.

Q.13. “Conspiring with him how to load and bless (1.3).” What does ‘conspiring’ refer to?

Ans. Here’conspiring refers to a figurative alliance between autumn and the sun.The Autumn and the Sun are personified here. They plan together to make the cottage trees over laden with apples, to swell the gourd and to fill the hazel nuts with sweet kernel.

Q.14. What are the fruits mentioned in the first stanza of Keats’ To Autumn?

Ans. The fruits mentioned in Keats’ To Autumn are the grapes, the apples, the gourd, the hazel nut, and the honey flowers.

Q.15. Why are the cottage trees said to be bending?

Ans. The cottage trees said to be bending because the moss-covered apple trees are bowed down nearly to the ground with their weight of fruits.

Q.16. How does the first stanza characterize Autumn?

Ans. The first stanza characterizes Autumn as a benevolent agent of earthly abundance.

Q.17. What are the four pictures of Autumn in the second stanza of the poem?

Ans. In the second stanza Keats’ To Autumn the autumn is represented in four pictures such as a harvester who sits careless on the granary floor; a tired reaper who feels drowsed with the fragrance of poppy; a gleaner on her way home and a cider-presser watching the apple juice oozing with utmost patience.

Q.18. Define symbol. What does Autumn symbolise?

Ans. A symbol suggests a range of reference beyond itself. In this sense all words in poetry are treated as symbols. A literary symbol, however, combines an image with a concept. Autumn in this poem is a symbol of abundance.

Q.19. “Until they think warm days will never cease (1.10).” Who think so and why?

Ans. The bees who gather honey from flowers in autumn think so. As honey is still available from flowers in Autumn, they think that summer days are still continuing. Actually bees suck honey from the autumnal flowers and hence the cells of their hives over brim with honey.

Q.20. How are the bees presented in To Autumn?

Ans. In the concluding lines of the opening stanza of the poem, the bees are presented as incapable of appreciating seasonal changes. Therefore, the bees are led to think that the warm season will never come to an end.

Q.21. Explain the line: “For summer has o’er-brimm’d their clammy cells (1.11).”

Ans. Here the repetition of the ‘m’ sound in the quoted line is suggestive of the satisfied hum of the bees. The bees are happy because the flowers that blossom during the later period of autumn will continue to be there so that their stock of honey will exist for ever.

Q.22. Why are the bees happy in the season Autumn?

Ans. The bees are happy because the flowers that blossom during the later period of autumn will continue to be there so that their stock of honey will exist for ever. Therefore, the bees are led to think that the warm season will never come to an end.

Q 23. “Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store (1.12)?” What does the ‘store’ refer to?

Ans. This is the opening line of the second stanza. Keats describes the season of Autumn in all its sights, movements and its various sounds in three stanzas respectively. The ‘store’ most likely refers to an accumulation slow passage of time.

Q.24. Describe the autumn sitting on a granary floor.

Ans. Autumn is seen as the harvester who sits careless on a granary floor and the gentle wind plays with her hair. Keats’ mythopoetic power is illustrated in personifying autumn in the image of a harvester. a

Q.25. “Thy hair soft lifted by the winnowing wind (1.15).” – Who is referred to in this line? What is meant by the winnowing wind?

Ans. Autumn that is personified as a farmer is referred to in this

line. ‘The winnowing wind’ refers to the fanning wind that

separates the grain from the chaff on the granary floor.

Q.26. Locate and annotate: “Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind (1.15).”

Ans. The line occurs in the second stanza of Keats’ To Autumn. Here ‘winnowing” refers to the activity of separating the grain from the husks. ‘Winnowing is the activity in which corn is thrown into the air so that the wind can separate the grain from the chaff or husks.

Q.27. “Or in a half reap’d furrow sound asleep (1.16)” Explain the image in the quoted line.

Ans. Here Autumn is represented as a tired reaper who falls asleep drowsed with the fragrance of poppy. The scythe is still in her hand and she just stops from cutting down the next bunch of poppies with all its twined flowers as she fast falls asleep. 

Q.28. Locate and annotate: “Drows’d with the fume of poppies (1.17).” .”

 

Ans. The line is taken from To Autumn. Thereference to poppy is noteworthy. The act of making opium by separating poppies by the wind is a common practice.

Q.29. “Spares the next swath (1.18).” What does the word ‘swath’ denote?

Ans. The word ‘swath’ denotes the amount of corns standing to be cut off. It is a line of corn cut by a mower’s sickle.

Q.30. How is Keats’ mythopoetic power illustrated?

Ans. Keats’ mythopoetic power is illustrated in personifying autumn in its various forms of human manifestations. This poem shows Keats at his best for the use of nature myths.

Q.31. Who is the gleaner? Where is she seen?

Ans. The gleaner is one who gathers corn left by the reapers. He or she is seen in fields of newly cut corn, when the ground looks bear with only the stubble showing.

Q.32. What is the cider press?

Ans. The cider press is a pressing machine in which ripe apples are pressed so that the juice comes out. In this poem autumn is seen in the image of a cider presser sitting beside a vat and watching the apple juice oozing.

Q.33. Describe after Keats the sounds that composed the music of Autumn.

Ans. The gnats mourn by the river; the lambs bleat from the hill; the grasshopper sing in the lane; the robin whistles in the garden; the swallows twitter in the skies. These composed the never ending music of Autumn.

Q.34. What is your opinion about autumnal music?

 Ans. The music of Autumn which ends the poem is a music of living and dying, of staying and departure, of summer and winter. In the evening when the sun sets and the sky and fields are tinged with rosy hue, the music of Autumn can be heard. 

Q.35. Is Keats serene in To Autumn? Give reasons for your answer.

Ans. In To Autumn Keats attains the serenity he has been seeking. According to Keats, our enjoying of the beauty and peace in this season, there is disturbed by no romantic longing, no classic aspiration, no looking before and after, no pining for what is not, no regret for the spring that is gone, and no prophetic thought of other spring to follow.

Q.36. What is the nature of music in Autumn?

 Ans. The music of autumn is a music of living and dying, of staying and departure, of summer and winter. The gnats, lambs, crickets, red breast and gathering swallows contribute to the music of autumn.

Q.37. When can the music of Autumn be heard?

Ans. In the evening when the sun sets and the sky and fields are tinged with rosy hue, the music of Autumn can be heard.

Q.38. Who contribute to the music of Autumn?

Ans. The gnats, lambs, crickets, red breast and gathering swallows contribute to the music of autumn.

Q.39. Name the insects, birds and animals described in the last stanza of the poem.

Ans. Crickets are the insects whose chirping sound is heard chiefly in winter. Swallows are the migratory birds getting ready to fly to any warmer countries in autumn. The full-grown lambs also produce music of autumn.

Q.40. Explain the lines” And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn; / Hedge-crickets sing: ………”

Ans. The line occurs in the third stanza of Keats’ To Autumn. Here ‘hilly bourn’ means small stream flowing down a hill. Crickets are the insects whose chirping sound is heard chiefly in winter.

Q.41. How does Keats describe Nature in To Autumn?

Ans. The poem Ode to Autumn is itself a store house of nature’s autumnal beauty. Keats describes the season of Autumn in all its sights, movements and its various sounds in three stanzas respectively. The poem, therefore, is a Nature poem.

Q.42. Describe the Hellenic quality of the poem Ode to Autumn?

Ans. The poem breathes out a genuine Hellenic spirit. In perfect tune with the Greek manner, Autumn is represented in human manifestations as a farmer, a reaper, a gleaner or a ciderpresser

 

Q.43. Does To Autumn contain a suggestion of mutability?

Ans. Autumn is described as a season of ripeness and fullness. But these very words are also indicative of mutability because ripeness leads to decay and death. Autumn will all its plenty will soon be overtaken by cold water. This melancholic tone is implicitly hinted at the concluding line of the poem.

Q.44. In what sense is the structure of the poem climactic?

Ans. To Autumn shows Keats at his best position. The poem praises the beauty and bounty of nature, unsallied by any worry or care. It celebrates the season of ripe fruits and flowers. The first stanza describes the abundance of Autumn. The second stanza deals with the sights of the season and the third with its sounds. The poem closes with a melancholy note that ripeness leads to decay.

Q.45. Locate and annotate: “Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they’? (1.23).

Ans. This is the opening line of the third stanza.The speaker’s answer to the questions posed in the quoted line expresses mainly the full recognition of the muted beauties of autumn. This melancholic tone is implicitly hinted at the quoted line of the poem.

Q.46. “Thou hast thy music too(1.23)”.What is the music referred to in this line?

Ans. This music of Autumn is made by the mourning choir of swarming gnats, the bleating of the full-grown lambs, the chirping of the hedge-cricket, the twittering of the swallows.

Q.47. “And gathering swallows twitter in the skies (1.33).” Explain the concluding line of the poem.

Ans. The swallows preparing for their departure is a distinct reference to the tragic destiny that Autumn with all its plenty and bounty will soon be overtaken by cold winter. This thought lends a note of melancholy to this concluding line.

Q.48. What does Keats celebrate in To Autumn?

Ans. In this poem, Keats celebrates the charm of the season. He alsocelebrates the music of the autumn. Keats celebrates the hymn of autumn. In the second stanza, Keats celebrates the autumn as a person.

 

49. When did Keats write the poem Ode to Autumn? Where was he staying then?

Ode to Autumn was possibly composed in September 1819. Keats was then staying at Winchester.

 

49. What is the structural division of Ode to Autumn with what distinct themes ?

 

From the structural angle, Ode to Autumn is a balanced marvel of Keats’s workmanship. The poem deals with autumn. The three stanzas of the poem are found to present the three aspects of the season—the natural setting of autumn with the warm sun, the misty weather, mellow fruitfulness abundant flowers and the songs of the season..

 

50. What sort of personifications is made by Keats to represent the spirit of autumn ?

 

The spirit of autumn is represented in three human figures, of course, all female ones. The first one is of a reaper, the other two are a gleaner and a cider-presser.

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