Advertisements
Advertisements

Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5

Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5

 

1 . How was Fantomina received when it was first published? How does the story’s ending makes it slightly more acceptable in the eyes of eighteenth1. century society [Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5]

Haywood was a popular writer when Fantomina was first published in 1725; however, there was a dispute in the reception of the presentation of Fantomina’s moral behavior and lack of remorse. Other eighteenth-century novels, such as Samuel Richardson’s Pamela , followed the traditional literary pattern for females: someone takes advantage of the protagonist against her will, and then ends up marrying the subject and restoring her virtue.

Haywood instead presents a protagonist who not only enjoys sex, but also feels no remorse about having these relations outside of marriage. There were thus concerns upon receiving this novella that women would read it and believe that they could commit the same sins. The ending perhaps makes the novella slightly more suitable for public reception. In Fantomina finally having to repent for her sins, the novel suggests that all actions have consequences for which one will eventually pay. depended on the strength of her virtue, to bear her safe thro

Advertisements

2. “She trials more dangerous than she apprehended this to be, and never having been addressed by him as a lady was resolved to receive his devoirs as a town-mistress, imagining a world of satisfaction to herself in engaging him in the character of such a one, and in observing the surprise he would be in to find himself refused by a woman who he supposed granted her favors without exception.” – Bring out the significance. – –

This quotation discusses the protagonist’s initial intentions and frame of mind when she first initiates her plan of disguise. Importantly, she has no intention of engaging in sexual activity with Beauplaisir. Making it clear that the protagonist begins as a woman who conforms to social norms of protecting her chastity and virtue makes the protagonist potentially more sympathetic to contemporary readers, who would be inclined to judge a woman who deliberately set out in pursuit of sexual gratification.

Instead, the novella becomes a story of how even a woman who expects to be able to maintain self-control can be seduced by the prospects of pleasure and freedom. The language of danger and trials in the quote creates a mood of foreshadowing, and implies that the protagonist is naive and misguided in her beliefs. While in some ways the quote serves to align the protagonist with a more conventional model of feminine behavior by highlighting her commitment to her chastity, it also reveals her desire to occupy a position of power. She takes pleasure in the idea of undermining Beauplaisir’s sense of control and dominance by turning him down after leading him to expect that she will have sex with him.

3. “In the present burning eagerness of desire, ’tis probable, that had he been acquainted both with who and what she really was, the knowledge of her birth would not have influenced him with respect sufficient to have aurbed the wild exuberance of his luxurious wishes, or made him in that longing, – that impatient moment, change the form of his addresses. In fine, she was undone; and he gained a victory so highly rapturous that had he known over whom, scarce could he have triumphed more.” · Explain.

This quotation reveals Beauplaisir’s state of mind the first time he and the protagonist have sex, and reveals the ambiguity around power and consent in this moment. The narrator notes that by this point Beauplaisir is so determined to have sex with the protagonist that even if he had known that she was a aristocratic woman, he would likely not have stopped.

It remains unclear whether the forceful, vigorous language such as eagerness’ and ‘impatience is meant to signal strenuous persuasion or outright force, but it is very clear that Beauplaisir does not take no for an answer, and persists in pressuring the protagonist to have sex even when she clearly indicates she does not want to.

Other words also signal that even though the protagonist has displayed agency in masterminding the plan to get to this point, she ends up losing power and being placed in a vulnerable position. “Undone” suggests the potential consequences of this sexual act for the protagonist, while the description of Beauplaisir’s “victory” implies that he has defeated or conquered her in some way, not that this was an act they mutually chose to engage in.

4. Does the reader ever discover who the unnamed protagonist truly is?

The novella’s entire plot is based on intrigue, in which the readers are naturally involved. Before the label ‘Fantomina’ is given to the protagonist, the readers are not given the protagonist’s identity, and they never learn her true name. We can therefore only judge the protagonist on her actions throughout the novella.

However, she completes nearly all her actions in her many different disguises; this suggests that perhaps the reader cannot conclude an accurate character judgement from these actions either, as it is unknown whether it is something that the protagonist would genuinely or if she does it only for the sake of her disguised persona. It can therefore be argued that the readership never discover the protagonist’s true identity, an unusual relationship between reader and protagonist.

5. “Thus did the lady’s vivacity and wit assist her in all but where it was most needful. She had discernment to foresee, and avoid all the ills which might attend the loss of her reputation, but was wholly blind to those of the ruin of her virtue; and having managed her affairs so as to secure the one, grew perfectly easy with the remembrance she had forfeited the other.” – Bring out the significance.

This quotation reveals one of the major juxtapositions in the character of the protagonist: she is remarkably intelligent and calculating, and yet at the same time she can be very naſve. She readily comes up with a lie that ensures no one will know she has spent the night with Beauplaisir and is able to devise a plan enabling her to continue seeing him in secret. At the same time, as the narrator points out, she remains blind to what the consequences of her liaison might be on a personal level.

In fact, because the protagonist is so confident that she can successfully have an affair while escaping social consequences, she seems to very quickly recover from any guilt or distress she might have felt when she first had sex with Beauplaisir. This quotation marks a moment where the protagonist experiences a renewed sense of power and control over her personal life, but fails to realize that by exercising sexual agency, she is actually endangering her future.

6. ‘He was willing to be at liberty to pursue new conquests; and (she] wisely considering that complaints, tears, swoonings and all the extravagances which women make use of in such cases have little prevalence over a heart inclined to rove and only serve to render those who practice them more contemptible by robbing them of that beauty which alone can bring back the furtive lover.’ Explain.

This quotation describes how the protagonist responds to the knowledge that Beauplaisir has grown tired of her and wants to go to Bath alone. It demonstrates both her control of her emotions, and her shrewd, pragmatic attitude. She immediately understands that her lover will not be moved by emotional displays. As the narrator notes, such displays are not only ineffective, they are actually counterproductive because a woman is less beautiful when she is weeping or scolding, and therefore her lover will be even less motivated to experience renewed interest in her.

This quotation reveals the way in which the novella often takes a somewhat cold and cynical perspective on romantic affairs, as it suggests that men are primarily motivated by admiration of physical beauty, and are not likely to feel empathy for emotional suffering. The protagonist does not seem disturbed or upset by Beauplaisir’s fickle nature, and accepts that it is her job to keep him interested, not his job to remain loyal to her.

7 . How does Haywood end her novel?

In the novel’s final section, the protagonist’s ruse is interrupted by two reassertions of authority, one social and the other biological. The abrupt appearance of her mother signals the return to a more socially conventional dynamic in which the protagonist’s behavior would be closely scrutinized and monitored by parental authority figures so as to maintain her reputation and value on the marriage market. From the very beginning, the protagonist’s ability to do whatever she wants and pursue her desires has been linked to the lack of parental supervision; when her mother appears, this freedom and autonomy quickly disappears. While her mother clearly does not know the extent of the liberties the protagonist has taken, she already has some suspicions. This suggests that the protagonist might not have been quite as discreet as she believes.

Pregnancy is the second and more serious consequence to the freedoms the protagonist has enjoyed. While the protagonist’s careful planning and foresight has helped her to avoid many of the social consequences of illicit sexual activity, she has not been able to avoid the biological one, and in a sense it seems that her body finally triumphs over her mind. At first, however, she seems confident in her ability to solve this problem just as she has resolved many others. Having the child in secret and presumably arranging to have it adopted would have been the most common strategy for aristocratic women trying to hide illegitimate pregnancies.

With her intelligence and wealth, it seems possible that the protagonist might be able to successfully execute this plan. When she goes into labor, she is in too much pain to be able to conceal it . For the first time, her ability to disguise herself fails her. When her mother realizes that she is in labor and becomes determined to find out the identity of the father, the physical pain of childbirth also finally breaks the protagonist’s secrecy. The mother coldly and ruthlessly exploits this suffering to her own end, but is also behaving shrewdly: she hopes that by confronting the father, she can shame him into marrying her daughter, thereby concealing the affair and legitimizing the child.

The mother’s success at obtaining Beauplaisir’s identity results in the novel’s climax, at which the protagonist is finally forced to reveal her deception. She has to endure the shame of admitting her scandalous behavior, and of surrendering control. Beauplaisir’s reaction is far more measured than might be expected, given how much he has been deceived. He does not lash out, and he offers to provide for his newborn daughter. More strikingly still , he continues to visit regularly and inquire about the protagonist.

Thus, for the three generations of women assembled at the end of the story, little seems to have changed. The protagonist has boldly challenged the status quo, and highlighted the ways in which a woman might occupy a complex identity. She is ultimately not successful in maintaining this position, and ends up ironically with far fewer freedoms than she would have possessed as a respectably married woman in England. Whether the ending should be read as a punishment for her transgressions or as an indictment of how society conspires to repress women is ambiguous. What is clear is that the protagonist’s innocent curiosity costs her a high price.

8. “I can only say that besides the alteration which the change of dress made in her, she was so admirably skilled in the art of feigning, that she had the power of putting on almost what face she pleased, and knew so exactly how to form her behavior to the character she represented that all the comedians at both playhouses are infinitely short of her performances.” Bring out the significance.

This quotation attempts to explain how the protagonist is successfully able to disguise her identity, even while pursuing intimate relationships with Beauplaisir. It implies that she has strong acting skills and that she also understands how factors such as education and social position can manifest in someone’s speech and mannerisms.

Part of what is so disruptive about the protagonist’s trickery is that she moves between different social classes. This cannot be achieved simply by altering one’s physical appearance: it also requires a finely nuanced understanding of how an aristocratic mwoman behaves differently from a maidservant. By being able to switch between these roles, the protagonist reveals both her own skill and cleverness, as well as the unsettling possibility that women from different social ranks might not be so different from each other after all.

9. What imagery can be found in the novel? 

Haywood wrote in an era that tended to focus less on prose description, so much of her imagery is subtle. Simply by setting the first scene of the novella in a playhouse, she conjures up imagery of wealthy individuals wearing their most fashionable clothes, and of a hot, crowded atmosphere in which bodies were crammed close together. The space of the theatre was always sexually charged and involved potential voyeurism, both because of the opportunity to watch bodies on stage and also the opportunity to observe individuals from different social classes gathered in the audience together.

 

In order to explain how Beauplaisir fails to see the similarity between his mistress and the woman he frequently observes in social situations, the narrator uses imagery to describe the contrast between them. When he sees the protagonist in disguise as Fantomina, she is wearing loose, flowing, and revealing clothing, all of which communicate intimacy and accessibility. The imagery of what she wears in formal situations is the exact opposite, with tight, impenetrable clothing and many jewels to signal her wealth and status. The imagery subtly conveys the difference in class position between the two women, and this is why Beauplaisir perceives them so differently.

After having sex with the protagonist in her disguise as Incognita, Beauplaisir persuades her to let him spend the night in hopes that he can see her face. He is very impatient for the day to dawn so that the room will be light enough for him to see. Imagery, particularly auditory imagery, is used to convey that it is morning; he can hear the sounds of the city coming to life outside of the house. The imagery is important because the room remains totally dark and he has to rely on the sounds to know what time it is. This darkness prevents him from seeing the face of the woman with whom he has spent the night; it also symbolizes the ignorance and blindness of Beauplaisir throughout the novel.

When the protagonist goes into labor, she is attending a court ball and tries to hide what is happening. She is in too much pain to disguise her suffering, and imagery is used to dramatically convey this. To other individuals, such as her mother, it seems like she must be extremely ill. This imagery conveys the physical pain and danger that the protagonist is in, and also suggests the way in which her pregnancy might be perceived as a punishment for her sexual transgressions.

Had he been faithful me, (said she, to herself) either as Fantomina, or Celia, or the Widow Bloomer, the most violent passion if it does not change its object, in time will wither: Possession naturally abates the vigour of desire, and I should have had at best but a cold, insipid, husband-like Lover

10. “…..arms, but by these arts of passing on him as a new mistress whenever the ardour which alone makes love a blessing, begins to diminish, for the former one, I have him always raving, wild, impatient, longing, dying.” – Explain.

In this passage, the protagonist rationalizes why it is actually to her advantage to be constantly deceiving Beauplaisir about her identity. She presents the cynical perspective that sexual passion is short-lived and that relationships are only exciting in their initial a new relationship leads him to be a more enthusiastic lover than if he were to remain stages. Thus, Beauplaisir constantly reenacting what he perceives to be the start of faithful to her.

The quote makes dear what is implicit throughout the novel that the protagonist, and by extension women in general, value sexual gratification as an important part of a romantic relationship. By contrasting the ardor of a man with whom she pursues an illicit relationship to a faithful but less sexually energetic husband, the quote subverts stereotypes of what women hope to obtain in their relationships.

11. How does Haywood represent gender politics in Fantomina?

Throughout her novella, Eliza Haywood presents gender politics that almost become more confusing the more they are studied. Beauplaisir believes he is dominant of all the women that he comes across, able to objectify them and consistently place his own satisfaction over that of the women. Yet the reader is privy to the fact that it is actually Fantomina who is in control. She cleverly makes a mockery of Beauplaisir in a way that is unbeknownst to anyone but herself.

In letting him believe that he is the dominant gender, she secretly secures the power for herself. Yet Fantomina troubles herself with the effort of donning different disguises because of her devotion to Beauplaisir, and accepts his exceedingly unfaithful behavior as normal. Therefore, it is perhaps indecipherable who has control over the gender politics in this novel. The most obvious answer would be Fantomina, as she is able to understand and manipulate Beauplaisir’s desires to achieve her own.

12. “She, covering herself with the cloaths, and ready to die a second time with the inward agitations of her soul, shriek’d out, Oh, I am undone! -I cannot live and bear this shame!” Who said this and why?

This quote is located at the point when the protagonist’s mother drags Beauplaisir into the room where the protagonist has just given birth. She realizes that she will have to reveal all of her actions, and reacts with horror and shame. Her attempt to hide herself under the bed cloths (“cloaths“) mirrors her various disguises throughout the novel, but now in a pathetic way: her trickery has failed. Interestingly, the phrase she uses to describe the situation (being “undone”) is the same word that the narrator used in a previous climatic moment, to describe the protagonist losing her virginity to Beauplaisir (see Quote 2).

This repetition of language could be interpreted in a number of ways. On one hand, it could suggest that the protagonist’s sexual activity was always going to be her downfall, and that she was doomed from the time she first had sex with Beauplaisir. On the other hand, it could reveal how the protagonist does not view her sexual behavior as transgressive, and is not ashamed of what she has done, but only that she failed to fully conceal it.

13. ‘A thousand times has he stood amazed at the prodigious likeness between his little mistress and this court beauty; but was still as far from imagining they were the same, as he was the first hour he accosted her in the playhouse though it is not impossible but that her resemblance to this celebrated lady, might keen his inclination alive something longer than otherwise they would have been; and that it was to the thoughts of this (as he supposed) unenjoy’d charmer, she owed in great measure the vigour of his latter caresses.’ – Explain.

This quotation describes Beauplaisir’s thoughts and feelings during the time in which he is pursuing an affair with protagonist disguised as Fantomina. The quotation adds a touch of realism to the novella in that it acknowledges that he does notice a physical resemblance between the protagonist and her disguised self. It also shows why the protagonist is able to successfully maintain the illusion: it is so inconceivable to Beauplaisir that a well-born woman could engage in the kind of behavior that his mistress does that he never even considers the possibility .

He does, however, achieve greater erotic satisfaction due to the resemblance, which also suggests part of the power that the protagonist wields by disguising herself . She can take advantage of the fantasy of having multiple women at the same time and also the possibility of combining traits from what are assumed to be totally separate social spheres. In her guise of Fantomina, the protagonist combines the elegance and education of a lady with the frank sexuality of a prostitute, and Beauplaisir finds the combination intoxicating.

14. How does the novella fit into its time and genre? What eighteenthcentury tropes and stereotypes are represented or subverted in the story?

Fantomina was an erotica novel written in 1725, and exhibits many different elements of its time and genre. In the eighteenth century, a subgenre began to develop known as amatory fiction. They were novels that were written about a mysterious woman, but could be subtly hinting that they are based on the life of a real person. Fantomina suggests this: in being a mysterious, upper-class woman, her pursuits could be based on a real account.

A further eighteenth-century stereotype that Haywood embodies is the ‘rake’, a stereotypical morally repugnant man with little in the way of standards. Beauplaisir is the ultimate embodiment of this stock character, and acts exactly as the philandering male is expected to: he makes false promises, entertains many different women at once, and is far from a moral crisis at the thought of hiring a prostitute multiple times. The novella is “modern” in the way that Fantomina is presented: instead of inhabiting this stereotype of a persecuted maiden’ who is helplessly wronged by a man, Fantomina relishes her deception and promiscuity.

15. How are class relations represented in the novella?

In eighteenth-century society, the traditional class system of previous years is inverted. While status and titles still mattered, class was now much more about your social identity: whom you knew, where you frequented, and what you wore. This is taken even further in Fantomina, as class and a social hierarchy only appear very subtly. They are most obvious at the beginning of the novella, where Fantomina is not only described as a Lady, but also as sitting in a privileged position at the theatre.

From then on, Haywood almost abolishes the class system through letting Fantomina choose to descend the hierarchy, and by basing interactions on carnal desires, rather than on public, social interactions. Class is therefore only properly instituted at the end of the story, where Fantomina’s Mother appears and acts as society would expect her to act: scolding her daughter then sending her off for punishment, away from the public eye.

                                                          ***********************************

Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 v

Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 v

Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 v

Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 v

Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 v

Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 Fantomina Eliza Haywood Pdf Questions and answers Marks 5 v

Leave a Comment

error: Content is protected !!
× Join Chat