The Purloined Letter Questions and Answers Marks-2

The Purloined Letter 

The Purloined Letter Questions and Answers Marks-2

 

 

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Q. 1. Nil sapientiae odiosius acumine nimio.- Bring out the meaning of this line? Where does it originally occur?

Ans. The English meaning of the quoted line is ‘Nothing is more hateful to wisdom than excessive cunning’. Edgar Allen Poe used this Latin phrase in 1845 as the motto of the second edition of his tale “The Purloined to Seneca.

Q. 2. What is the place where the actions of the story The Purloined Letter take place? Mention the time when the story begins.

 

Ans. The actions of the story The Purloined Letter take place in Paris. The stroy begins just after dark of one gusty evening in the autumn.

Q. 3. What is the name of the detective in the story “The Purloined Letter”? Where did he live?

Ans. The name of the detective in The Purloined Letter is C. Auguste Dupin. His address was the third floor of the building, No. 33, Rue Dunot, Faubourg St. Germain.

Q. 4. What is meant by meerschaum?

Ans. Meerschaum is a soft white clay-like material consisting of hydrated magnesium silicate, found chiefly in Turkey. In The Purloined Letter, it refers to a tobacco pipe with a bowl made from meerschaum.

Q. 5. Who is Monsieur G-? Why did he come to Mr. Dupin?

Ans. Monsieur G- was an old acquaintance of Mr. Dupin and the narrator and he was the Prefect of the Parisian police.

Mr. G-came to Mr. Dupin to take counsel about a case regarding recovery of a letter of a royal lady that was stolen from royal apartment by Minister D

Q. 6. What is the English meaning of the Latin phrase au troisieme ?

Ans. The English meaning of the phrase au troisieme is “third floor’.

Q. 7. “who had a fashion of calling every thing “odd” that was beyond his comprehension” – Who had a fashion of calling every thing “odd”?

Ans. This is said about Monsieur G-, the Prefect of the Parisian Police, by the narrator of the story The Purloined Letter by Edgar Allen Poe.

Q. 8. “Nothing more in the assassination way, I hope?”- Who is the speaker and whom does the speaker say it?

. AnsThe narrator of the story The Puloined Letter, by Edgar Allen Poe asks this to Mr. G-, the Prefect of the Parisian Police.

9. Q. “Perhaps it is the very simplicity of the thing which puts you at fault,” Who is the speaker and whom does the speaker say it? What does the person spoken reply?

. AnsMr. Dupin says this to Mr. G-, the Prefect of the Parisian Police in the story The Purloined Letter by Edgar Allen Poe.
Q. 10. Why does Mr. G- give caution to Mr. Dupin and the narrator before revealing them the subject of the case in his hand?

Ans. Mr. G says that he will tell the case in a few words; but, before he begins, he should caution them that this is an affair demanding the greatest secrecy, and that he would most probably lose the position he now holds, were it known that he confided it to anyone.

Q. 11. Why does Mr. G- express his confidence that the purloined letter is still in the possession of the person who has stolen it?

Ans. Mr. G says that it is clearly inferred from the nature of the document, and from the nonappearance of certain results which would at once arise from its passing out of the robber’s possession; that is to say, from his employing it as he must design in the end to employ it.

Q. 12. What, according to Mr. G-, was the power of the purloined letter?

Ans. Mr. G tells that he may venture so far as to say that the paper gives its holder a certain power in a certain quarter where such power is immensely valuable.” He says that the disclosure of the document to a third person, who shall be nameless, would bring in question the honour of a personage of most exalted station; and this fact gives the holder of the document an ascendancy over the illustrious personage whose honour and peace are so jeopardized.

Q. 13. “But this ascendancy,” I interposed, “would depend upon the robber’s knowledge of the loser’s knowledge of the robber.” Who is the speaker and whom does the speaker say this?

Ans. The narrator of the story The Purloined Letter by Edgar Allen Poe asks this to Mr. G, the Prefect of the Parisian Police. The narrator means to say that the holder of the letter cannot blackmail the loser unless the loser is aware of the holder and who can challenge a royal personage.

Q. 14. How does Mr. G-express explain the desperateness of the Minister to steal the letter?

Ans. Mr. G, the Prefect of the Parisian Police, discloses the identity of the holder of the letter. He says that it is the Minister D-, who dares all things, those suitable as well as those unsuitable for a man.

Q. 15. “His lynx eye immediately perceives the paper” – Who is the person mentioned here as ‘his’?

Ans. Mr. G, while describing the incident of the stealing the letter addressed to the royal lady, says this about Mr. D, the cunning Minister.

Q. 16. How did Mr. G get the case of recovering the purloined letter?

Ans. Mr. G says that Mr. D- has attained a political power over the royal lady and the power thus attained has, for some months past, been wielded, for political purposes, to a very dangerous extent. The lady is more thoroughly convinced, every day, of the necessity of reclaiming her letter. But this, of course, cannot be done openly. Finally, driven to despair, she has committed the matter to Mr. G

Q. 17. “With the employment the power departs” – Who says this? Why?

Ans. The narrator comments this, in the story The Purloined Letter, about the probability of the possession of the purloined letter by the Minister D He comments that it is clear as Mr. G observes that the letter is still in possession of the minister; since it is this possession, and not any employment of the letter, which bestows the power. The narrator comments that with the employment the power departs……..

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The Purloined Letter Questions and Answers Marks-2

The Purloined Letter Questions and Answers Marks-2

 

 

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